Blog archive: Yemen

  • 6th December 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    The official Yemeni news agency reports a meeting between foreign minister Qirbi and Criag Jenness, director of the UN's Electoral Assistance Division. It appears that Yemen is seeking "UN technical and logistical assistance" in the presidential election scheduled for February 21....
  • 4th December 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
       Having signed the GCC's ludicrous "transition agreement" under international pressure, President Saleh shows no sign of relinquishing power in Yemen and the situation continues to deteriorate. Fighting has been going on for several days now in the city of Ta'izz,...
  • 28th November 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    It has been widely reported that the Yemen "transition" agreement signed last week includes immunity for President Saleh and members of his entourage. This led to protests in Yemen at the weekend calling instead for Saleh's prosecution. If guarantees of immunity have indeed been given...
  • 18th November 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Journalists have a hard time in Yemen. Most are badly paid and many take on other jobs to supplement their income.  The Yemeni press (with one or two exceptions) is also highly partisan. That is far from ideal but it is less of a problem than outsiders often imagine. There's a diversity of...
  • 17th November 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Reuters news agency has finally issued a statement about Mohamed Sudam, its Yemen-based reporter who also works as President Saleh's official interpreter and secretary. The Felix Arabia blog provides this translation of the statement which was originally issued in Arabic...
  • 15th November 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    If you follow the news from Yemen you have almost certainly come across reports from Reuters' long-serving correspondent in Sana'a, Mohamed Sudam. You may not have been aware, though, that over many years he has also combined his work for one of the world's leading news agencies with another job –...
  • 22nd October 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    On Friday the UN security council unanimously approved a resolution on the situation in Yemen – its first such resolution since the uprising began. As expected, the resolution (full text here) calls on President Saleh to accept the Gulf Cooperation Council's wretched "transition plan"...
  • 1st October 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    The killing of Anwar al-Awlaki in Yemen raises questions about its likely impact on the country's politics – in particular, whether it will hasten or delay President Saleh's departure. Internationally, Saleh has tried to present himself as a lone bulwark resisting al-Qaeda and uses it...
  • 23rd September 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    UPDATED  President Saleh, who had been receiving treatment in Saudi Arabia since he was badly injured in an assassination attempt last June,arrived in Sanaa suddenly on Friday morning amid celebratory gunfire from his supporters. The situation in Yemen has deteriorated markedly...
  • 6th September 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Efforts to resolve the political crisis in Yemen are now focusing on a transition plan proposed by the United Nations rather than the earlier plan put forward by the Gulf Cooperation Council. AFP reports that President Saleh's party, the General People's Congress, has agreed to discuss the...
  • 1st September 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Just over a month ago I noted that the Bell Pottinger, one of Britain's leading public relations firms, had been hired by President Saleh's regime in Yemen and was working for "an unnamed special entity" set up by the government in Sana'a. Research by the Bureau for Investigative...
  • 31st August 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    The political situation in Yemen remains as confused as ever – which is why I have avoided writing about it for some time. However, there are now a few signs of movement. In a speech to mark the end of Ramadan, President Saleh (who is still in Saudi Arabia after being injured in a bomb...

Pages