Blog archive: Yemen

  • 3rd March 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    There is talk of "initial agreement" in Yemen on a five-point plan put forward by opposition leaders which includes President Salih leaving office nine months from now.  Under pressure, Salih has already said he will step down in September 2013 when his current term ends. The nine-month...
  • 28th February 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Nobody can govern in Yemen without support from the tribes and on Saturday influential figures from the country's two main tribal groupings – the Hashid and the Bakil – abandoned President Salih. "I announce my resignation from the General People's Congress [the ruling party] in protest at the...
  • 12th February 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Lest we forget that Yemen also has a place called Tahrir Square, here's an account from Human Rights Watch about the events there yesterday: Hundreds of men armed with knives, sticks, and assault rifles attacked anti-government protesters in Yemen's capital, Sanaa, as Yemeni security...
  • 7th February 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    National politics or tribal politics? In Yemen it's often difficult to tell the difference, as illustrated by a violent spat on Saturday involving Hamid al-Ahmar, one of the most outspoken opposition MPs, and Nu'man Duwaid, the governor of Sana'a province. Al-Ahmar is a prominent figure in the...
  • 4th February 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Tens of thousands took part in Yemen's "day of rage" yesterday, and it looks like becoming a regular Thursday occurrence. The turnout was probably less than the organisers had been hoping and I doubt that it did much to frighten President Salih. Although he is increasingly unpopular, the opposition...
  • 3rd February 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Today has been declared a "day of rage" in Yemen and a demonstration is about to start in Sanaa as I write. This follows a series of protests in the capital last month (here and here) in which several thousands took part. The organisers are hoping for a much bigger turnout today – but...
  • 23rd January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    There were more anti-government protests in Algeria and Yemen yesterday. In Yemen, about 2,500 students and opposition activists demonstrated at Sana'a University, calling for President Salih to go. Although recent demonstrations have increasingly focused on Salih's...
  • 21st January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    The Tunisia effect continues with a Reuters headline, "Protests erupt in Yemen", reporting that thousands took to the streets in the central city of Ta'izz yesterday. This followed two nights of rioting by secessionist supporters in the southern city of Aden on Tuesday and...
  • 13th January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Hillary Clinton paid a surprise five-hour visit to Yemen on Tuesday en route from the Emirates – the first vist by a US secretary of state for more than 20 years. A good deal of the media interest focused on her fall as she boarded the plane to leave but since her departure...
  • 2nd January 2011
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Yemen's parliament has begun debating constitutional changeswhich, among other things, would allow President Salih to continue in power indefinitely. The presidency is currently limited to two seven-year terms – meaning that Salih must leave office in 2013. Salih has already been in power...
  • 21st December 2010
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    It has emerged that the four people attacked in Sana'a last week (and described rather vaguely by the US embassy as "foreign residents" of Yemen) were in fact working for the CIA. Their vehicle, a Toyota Hilux pickup truck, had stopped near the Pizzaiola restaurant in the Hadda...
  • 20th December 2010
    By
    Brian Whitaker
    Yemen's southern separatists kidnapped an army officer near Habilayn (Lahej province) at the weekend – apparently as a bargaining ploy for the release of prisoners. The officer, identified by the Yemen Post as Major Muhammad al-Khawlani and by AFP as Captain Mohammed Ali...

Pages